The Hunger Games Trilogy: Mockingjay Part 2

First off, if you haven’t watched the film yet, and you don’t want spoilers, leave. But other than that, this is a must-watch film, also, it’s best if you already read the books, or at least watched the previous movies to fully appreciate this.

I’ve read the entire trilogy a couple of years back, and I’m so eager to finally see the finale of The Hunger Games Trilogy in film.  Anticipating this, my heart raced a little faster than it should as I thought of Prim’s underserved death and while taking our seats, I’ve been brimming with sadness that Peeta’s gorgeous physique would soon be one legless but still handsomely body.

***

In one gulp, this fourth and final leg of The Hunger Games is about Katniss, the Mockingjay, leading a rebellion against the Capitol. Determined to end the bloodbath entertainment of the yearly games, Katniss under the wings of District 13’s President Alma Coin,  teamed up with Gale and other victors including Peeta and Finnick in a mission, an attempt to assassin President Coriolanius Snow in the midst of a soon-to-be full scale war of Panem’s Capitol against its Districts.

***

Reading the book first hand, I personally noticed a bit of changes in the movie. Some of the changes were:

  1. Plutarch didn’t shine well. The book has a lot of Plutarch appearances but since Philip Seymore Hoffman died in the middle of the film-making, some of his scenes were either replaced or omitted. The scene where Plutarch should talk personally with Katniss was replaced by Haymitch loudly reading Plutarch’s letter to Katniss.
  2. Katniss looks like a trained soldier where in fact, Coin didn’t let her join at first because she’s not capable. But, the twist is, although Katniss looks loaded, she in the movie, didn’t kill a random Capitol woman.
  3. The girl in the yellow coat didn’t get shot, but I think the audience will still think that the girl’s a goner since all children were pulled out in front. Killing every children, including Prim.
  4. Katniss should have major burns that it contorts her face, but, alas, in the film, her face is still her face, I guess. Plus,
  5. Katniss should have battled a trauma, but in the film, she looks like she already is healed inside. I think, this movie is more forgiving and gentle than the book.
  6. Peeta got to keep his leg. This movie IS more forgiving and gentle than the book, I dare say.
  7. But to make the fresh wound bleeds, Annie Cresta keeps in touch with Peeta through letters with a photo of her and her baby with Finnick. Heart sinking. I take it back, this movie is unforgiving as the book.

I think these changes didn’t affect how wonderfully the movie has been executed because regardless of these, the movie didn’t turn out well, it turned out great! (Coming from someone who reads the entire trilogy).

I remember Finnick telling Katniss “Welcome to the 76th Hunger Game!” and the unforgettable scenes for me were Bogg’s, the liquid tar pod that killed Mitchell and the scene with the mutts. The mutts gave me nightmares!

Prim’s death really blows hard every time (reading and watching) this trilogy, the very person Katniss wants to protect from the start, died. And then I threw my fist in the air (at least in my head, I did) right after Katniss draw an arrow straight to Coin’s deceitful heart.

***

Thank you Mommy Lariza, MBP and MOD Production for treating us with a movie date!

I’ll end this post with my favorite lovey-dovey scenes:


Yes, you can say that I’m #teamPeeta!

Remember, some may love Gale. Some may love Peeta. But everyone loves Finnick.

I leave the movie theater thinking about Finnick. The Hunger Games is unforgiving, as always.

***

May the odds be forever in your favor.

***

And, why did it seems like Gale traitored Katniss in the movie?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s